FAQS

Here we have tried to answer the most common and frequently asked questions that we get from our clients. If you have a question that isn’t answered here, feel free to leave us a comment or email us at thailand@ptclabs.com. We’re here to help you answer some of life’s most important questions.

Q: THERE COULD BE MORE THAN ONE ALLEGED FATHER, AND THEY MIGHT BE RELATED. CAN I JUST TEST ONE OF THEM?

A: No. If there is more than one possible Father, and the possible Fathers are closely related to each other (i.e. as brothers, or as father and son), then it is very important to provide DNA samples for both of them when testing for paternity. This is because the testing of one Alleged Father, only identifies a probability of paternity for that Alleged Father compared to other unrelated men.

Therefore, if two possible Fathers are closely related, then their DNA genetic makeup can be very similar, and they could easily both receive a positive paternity test result. In that case, we will continue testing (at no extra charge) until one of the Alleged Fathers is conclusively excluded as the Father. But it is best to DNA test all related parties who could be the Father of the Child.

The same applies to related Alleged Mothers in a Maternity DNA Test.

Do you charge to keep testing if both the related Alleged Fathers initially receive a positive paternity result?

When DNA samples for all related Alleged Fathers are provided for testing, we do not charge for the additional testing that is needed to compare related DNA. However, for each additional Father that is tested, there is a DNA profile that needs to be generated for that person before the comparison testing can commence. Therefore, this does incur an Additional Person Fee per additional person tested. The same applies to related Alleged Mothers in a Maternity DNA Test.

If only one of the related Alleged Fathers is available for testing, please contact us. You may be able to do a different type of DNA Test, such as a Family Reconstruction, in order to establish a likelihood that the tested man is the biological Father, as opposed to the unavailable relative.